Bill 30 Occupational Health and Safety Act: Help shape Alberta’s New Workplace Rules

The Occupational Health and Safety Act (the act) establishes the minimum standards for healthy and safe workplaces in Alberta. These laws are supported through the internal responsibility system and enforced through compliance activities. An Act to Protect the Health and Well-being of Working Albertans updates the act to better protect Albertans at work. Most of the changes come into effect June 1, 2018.The new Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act takes steps to protect workers from harassment and violence in all its forms. It also requires joint work site health and safety committees or a worker health and safety representative, depending on workforce size. The input will help shape specific rules around these new requirements to ensure the legislation is fair and balanced.

ALIGN  will be completing the survey – if member agencies have any questions please email cathym@alignab.ca
Albertans can provide written submissions until April 9, 2018. Specific rules regarding harassment and violence, as well as training and operation of the joint work site health and safety committees, will be added to OHS regulations on June 1.

Correspondence to ALIGN E.D. from Alberta Labour re Bill 30 March 2018

Dear Rhonda Barraclough,

Last year the Government of Albertatook an important step in improvingthe health and safety of workingAlbertans by modernizing the Occupational Health and Safety Act (Act) and aligning Alberta’s approach to workplace safety with that of other Canadian jurisdictions.  With valuable input from a wide range of industry and labour stakeholders, as well as ordinary Albertans, the new Act comes into force on June 1, 2018.

The new Act contains provisions on harassment and violence, and requires that many Albertan work sites have a joint work site health andsafety committee or a health andsafety representative.  Thesechanges better reflect the way that Albertans work, as well as the hazards that they face on the job.  They also bring to our province the best practices and requirements for health and safety from the rest of Canada; however, regulatory changes are needed to give full effect to these new provisions.

You/your organization is invited to provide written feedback on proposed regulation (see attachment) for workplace harassment and violence, as well as for the establishment, functions, and training for joint work site health and safety committees and health and safety representatives.

This Discussion Guide with proposed content is available here.  You may also view the Discussion Guide at Labour website.  Please fill out the questions in the attached guide and email to lbr.review@gov.ab.ca by April 9, 2018.

Your input will help to ensure that Alberta’s OHS legislation is clear, comprehensive, and meaningful.  Thank you in advance for participating and helping to make Alberta the best place to live and work in Canada.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Lenore Neudorf Assistant Deputy Minister Strategy and Policy Alberta Labour

ALIGN Updates on Bill 17

ALIGN E.D. Rhonda Barraclough – Communication With Rae-ann Lajeun January 16, 2018

ALIGN Impacts of Bill 17 Jan 2018 – revised-1 known and anticipated impacts for Child and Family Service agencies

.    As we discussed before most folks are in agreement that the Bill makes sense and is good for Albertans generally,  but there has been some unintended consequences for our sector.  There are some questions in this document that hopefully Labor can answer.  I have to say I keep hearing that people call one time and get and answer then call again for clarity and get a different answer so it has been extremely frustrating.  If they can provide answers to some of these questions it would be helpful.

To answer your earlier questions

  1. We have not heard issues with minimum wage – I have only heard from woods homes as its an issue for their driving program.  We will have compression issues down the road but hopefully by then contracts will have added compensation.  This is also not the case for disability services, they do have minimum wage concerns.
  2. The averaging agreements really don’t help with the overtime debt.  Because the agreements require a schedule and in Family Support there is no schedules or they cannot be open/broad enough and in a 24/7operation it will remain a need.  Therefore there  needs to be compensation in the contracts  some how, it is our hope that Children Services is figuring this into the budget and renewals of contracts:
  3. Compensation for holiday pay needs to be added to the contracts as there is no way to avoid those costs and the agencies don’t have it in their current contracts and that I will send examples separately.

Thanks for helping to make this a workable solution.  We look forward to our meeting on Thursday.

See More ALIGN Communications related to Bill 17

The Role of Caregivers in Assessing and Managing Risk Related to Opioid Use – A Tip Sheet

This Tip Sheet that has been developed by a committee representing provincial Children Services , AFPA and ALIGN.

The Role of Caregivers in Assessing and Managing Risk Related to Opioid Use – A Tip Sheet
As a caregiver you are the closest person to the day-to-day activities of a child or youth who may be using opioids. You have a key role on the team who together ensure the tasks in the above diagram occur, plans are implemented and reviewed as circumstances change.

The tip sheet is going out to all the members as agencies have all types of caregivers providing service to children, youth and families. Specific Caregiver Training has also be developed and will be piloted for the fist time at the Alberta Foster Parent Conference this coming weekend. Once feedback is incorporated into the training  the manual will be made available for all to use. I will keep you posted as information becomes available. In the meantime please give the TIP Sheet the widest distribution. Questions can be directed to Cathym@alignab.ca

See Additional or Related Opioid Information

 

Alberta Association for Safety Partnerships (AASP) as a Certifying Partner

 Post May 17, 2018

New ALIGN Training 2018 – Roadmap to Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems for ALIGN Members

ALIGN & AASP: Roadmap to COR Power Point Presentation

Memo to ALIGN Membership Re: Occupational Health and Safety Grant

ALIGN has some good news to share with our member agencies. We were successful in obtaining a 2018 Occupational Health and Safety Innovation and Engagement Grant in partnership with the Alberta Association for Safety Partnerships (AASP) from the Ministry of Labour to provide free training to representatives of member agencies who are interested in developing and implementing a formal Health and Safety Management System.

With the many changes brought about by Bill 17 in January 2018, and the amendments coming to the Occupational Health and Safety Act on June 1, 2018 through Bill 30: An Act to Protect the Health and Well-being of Working Albertans; agencies will have had many new things to learn and become educated in as well as continuing to do the necessary every day work of supporting Alberta’s most vulnerable children and families.

Learn more about our Partners and what this grant and training means to your agency: Read full ALIGN OHS Training Grant Memo Spring 2018pdf

Training is intended for member agency directors, supervisors or OHS representatives involved in applying the new OHS Act. It will be offered in Edmonton, Red Deer, Calgary and Lethbridge. Training will consist of three full days that build on each other with assignments in between, commencing in June 2018 with the second day in September 2018 and third one in the November/ December 2018. A fourth day for overview and review will be provided early in 2019. Dates to be determined. A strong commitment to attending all the training sessions is needed; training will be free and manuals supplied, individuals will be provided the support they need to be successful.

Once the training is completed and the agency has successfully developed and implemented a health and safety program that meets provincial standards, they will be in a position to apply for a Certificate of Recognition (COR) or a Small Employer COR (SECOR). The COR certifies that the employer’s health and safety management system has been evaluated by a certified auditor and met the requirements as per the provincial standards. Certificates are issued by Alberta Labour and are co-signed by Alberta Association for Safety Partnerships (AASP). Achieving and maintaining a valid COR is required for earning a financial incentive through the WCB Partnerships in Injury Reduction Program.

Registration will be on a first come first serve basis and will be available middle of May – please check the ALIGN training page after May 15th for dates and locations . Only one individual per agency (OHS rep) will be accepted into the program as class size is limited. Larger agencies may place a second person on a wait list. If you have any questions please contact Cathy Mitchell at cathym@alignab.ca

Posted September 2017

We met with a representative for the Ministry of Labor in the Partnership Unit in the spring who recommended ALIGN explore the possibility of a collaborative relationship with the Alberta Association for Safety Partnerships(AASP) as a Certifying Partner. Conversations with the ED of the AASP have occurred and the plan is to apply jointly for grant funding from the Ministry of Labor to provide interested agencies with a series of training sessions (referred to as “The Roadmap to COR”) to obtain a Certificate of Recognition. Concurrently we will meet with agencies who have successfully obtained their COR and see what we can learn from them to pass on to other agencies.

Elder Capacity Pilot

Update September 2017

ALIGN sponsored 3 Elders to attend a Elder Capacity Building pilot and hosted a 20 participants at a  Cultural Solutions 2016 session April 2017 through a grant from Children Services and is in continue discussions to help further the knowledge and practice capacity in these areas. The Purpose of  the Elder Capacity Building Pilot is to build elders capacity in urban and rural First Nation settings, who are working with children and families who are at risk of being involved in the Child Intervention system, either through the Ministry of Child and Families or through contracted agencies in Alberta.

Indigenous Thought Leader Symposium

Update April 2018

The Indigenous Thought Leaders Presentation Videos

Indigenous Protocol Process Video’s

Update September 2017

ALIGN has been busy  coordinating an Indigenous Thought Leader Symposium that will be held for Children and Family Serving organizations Leadership on October 23, 2017 at the Fantasyland Hotel in Edmonton. The day will highlight Alberta Indigenous Thought leaders and Knowledge Keepers and how to move knowledge into policy and service delivery. The Indigenous Thought Leader Symposium is intended to enhance indigenous innovations and relationships in child intervention service delivery. Starting in Ceremony, selected Elders, advisors, and service providers will share Indigenous teachings and current practices in work with Indigenous children, families, and individuals. The presentations will showcase specific culturally-based approaches to practice and ceremony with indigenous service users. The day will include teachings from highly respected elders and knowledge keepers in Alberta. Various Alberta-based programs providing culturally appropriate and effective services will be highlighted. The outcome will be that participants will have an opportunity to explore how they can utilize the guidelines and principles in policy development and service delivery. This full day event will be held in ceremony and highlight cultural practices.

 

Resiliency Framework (Previously Early Intervention – Prevention and Early Intervention Framework)

Updated July 23, 2018
Survey Well-Being and Resiliency Evaluation Framework Deadline July 25, 2018.
Survey

Thank you for providing feedback on the Well-Being and Resiliency Evaluation Framework. This framework accompanies the provincial Well-being and Resiliency Framework, and seeks to develop an evaluative reporting and monitoring plan to determine the extent that primary prevention and early intervention programs funded by Children’s Services are achieving outcomes. We greatly value your time and feedback.

Survey Purpose
The purpose of this survey is to gain a better understanding of community agencies’ experience and perspective as it relates to well-being and resilience overarching outcomes; to clearly articulate measurable outcomes; and identify common indicators.

Voluntary and Confidential
Your participation in this survey is voluntary. The information you provide will be used only for the indicated purpose in conformity with the Alberta Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPP). Your answers are confidential and will be used only for project purposes. Following ethical standards, the information you provide will be stored in a secure database for five years and then destroyed. The results of this project will be analyzed and reported only in group format. No single person or agency will be identifiable.

Dates and Further Information
This survey will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. Please complete this survey by July 25, 2018.

If you have questions about the survey, please let us know at any time. You can reach PolicyWise for Children & Families by contacting the manager of this project, Naomi Parker: nparker@policywise.com

Take Survey

 

Feedback Session for the Resiliency Framework (previously named the Prevention and Early Intervention Framework,)
Calgary June 22, 2018 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (lunch will be provided)

In follow up to consultations held in May on the Resiliency Framework, you are invited to attend a session with PolicyWise to provide consultation on the evaluation framework that has been developed to support provincial implementation of the Resiliency Framework. Your feedback will be valuable as we move forward with this initiative. Thank you

Enhancing Prevention and Early Intervention

Supports and services towards prevention and early intervention are equally as important as providing quality child protection services in helping to ensure positive outcomes for children, youth and families. The Ministry continues to work collaboratively with community partners to ensure the delivery of a wide range of effective prevention and early intervention programs and services. In 2016/2017, the Ministry initiated a process to redevelop its Prevention and Early Intervention Framework to The Well-Being and Resiliency Framework, in order to ensure alignment with current and emerging trends, research, and Indigenous worldviews. The redeveloped Framework will support decision-making in the Ministry for funding and service delivery; define key elements of services; communicate how the program provides prevention and early intervention; and, outline a process and criteria for the review and improvement of programs and services. Collaboration with Indigenous partners, community agencies and regional staff is underway to ensure Indigenous ways of knowing, recommendations from the Ministerial Panel on Child Intervention and current research are incorporated.

Reaching families early, even as early as pregnancy, is an important element of success in the design of proven prevention programs. The emerging body of research on the science of brain development supports the importance of initiating prevention services early to support parent-child attachment and the social-emotional development of infants and young children. For the greatest success, the Framework will be redeveloped to meet the needs of families at multiple levels – across a continuum of needs. The Framework will continue to be based on a continuum of prevention and early intervention service domains: Child Development and Wellbeing; Caregiver Capacity Building; and, Social Connections and Supports.

To support provincial implementation of the Well-Being and Resiliency Framework,  an ongoing monitoring and evaluation plan will be developed to ensure the expected short, medium and long-term outcomes are clearly articulated to be specific, measureable, reasonably achievable, relevant and timely. The monitoring and evaluation plan will include indicators and measures for the continuum of services; processes to measure and report on the outcomes and effectiveness of these programs for Indigenous participants; and, support regular reporting on the achievement of the overarching outcome of helping infants, children and youth be safe and reach their full potential. The redeveloped Framework is expected to be completed in Summer 2018, with implementation to follow in the fall. Given the emerging body of research and literature surrounding the enhancement of well-being and resiliency in families, the Framework is intended to be a ‘living document’, that will live on-line, providing the ability to update information as necessary as part of the implementation and evaluation processes.

Update June 7, 2018

Feedback Session for the Resiliency Framework (previously named the Prevention and Early Intervention Framework,)
Innisfail June 22, 2018 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (lunch will be provided)

In follow up to consultations held in May on the Resiliency Framework, you are invited to attend a session with PolicyWise to provide consultation on the evaluation framework that has been developed to support provincial implementation of the Resiliency Framework. Your feedback will be valuable as we move forward with this initiative. Thank you

Update May 2018

ALIGN Members invited to provide feedback to the revisions and update of the Prevention and Early Intervention Framework in both Calgary and Edmonton May 2018.

Still Time to Register! Calgary -May 29, 2018
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Hull Services
2266 Woodpark Avenue SW,Calgary
Registration Link

Nicole McFadyen ALIGN –Nicolem@alignab.ca

Update September 2017

ALIGN  has recently had discussions with the Ministry about agency input in to the refresh of the Prevention and Early Intervention Prevention Framework for Children, Youth and Families

Related Resources
Together We Raise Tomorrow: An Alberta Approach to Alberta Early Childhood Development 2013

 

The Procurement Advisory Table (PAT) Final Report to the Ministers of Community and Social Services and Children’s Services August 2017

Update September 2017

Procurement, contracting and contracts continue to be a bit of a ambiguous.  We have met with the DM and Minister regarding the need to have contracts move forward.  We were told that in reality little will move until the Child Intervention Panel concludes and makes recommendations.  We continue to advocate that parts of the system still can be procured, or negotiated.

Procurement Advisory Table – Final Report August 2017

The Procurement Advisory Table (PAT) provided its Final Report to the Ministers of Community and Social Services and Children’s Services. The report includes recommendations for the departments to consider for designing and implementing future contracting approaches.

Arrangements are underway to schedule a meeting involving ALIGN (Rhonda Barraclough) ECVO (Russ Dahms)  ACDS (Andrea Hesse) and Deputy Ministers for both Ministry of Children’s Services and Community and Support Services Shannon Marchand and Darlene Bouwsema the second week of September to determine a course of action going forward considering changes that have occurred since the report was tabled in December.

Related

Response from Minister Sabir to PAT Co-Chair,  Russ Dahms

Terms of Reference

Membership List

Previous PAT Updates

See ALIGN Directory of Contracting News

 

 

A “Sneak Peak” of AMP New Indigenous Mentoring Resources

SNEAK PEAK: Resources for Mentoring Refugee, Immigrant & Newcomer Children and Youth

To access the resource one more step is required. Please fill in your contact information to assist in the role-out and evaluation of our new resource. AMP will not share your information, it is only for internal tracking purposes. In the next few months they will send you a brief survey asking for feedback.


Notice to Members  from Michael Jan August 1, 2017

AMP partners work to expand and enhance quality youth mentoring programs for young adults across Alberta.  Here is an exclusive opportunity for a “Sneak Peak” of the new Indigenous Mentoring resources. You might use different language or program labels other than mentoring, but the principles and considerations outlined in the document are valuable for any program that supports Indigenous or non-Indigenous relationships. Share your feedback with Michael Janz michael.janz@albertamentors.ca about how this can be further mobilized into the community.

While ALIGN is a valued “Builder Partner” of the AMP (and Rhonda Barraclough is a member of the Leadership Team), each individual agency should be listed as a AMP Partner! If you have not done so already, please take a moment and fill out our “Partner contact form” so AMP can promote your work and your agency and you can take advantage of our volunteer recruitment capacity! Don’t worry, there is no charge because we are a no-fee partnership

AB Child Review Panel 2017

ALIGN REQUEST FOR AGENCY/EXPERTS PARTICIPATION
At the announcement of the Child intervention review panel ALIGN Board members and our ED crafted a letter to Premier Notely, the Minister at the Time, and the leaders of the opposition to remind them that child intervention should be a nonpartisan issue.  We also encouraged the panel have some experts from the field on it.  The new Minister has appointed Drs Bruce MacLaurin, University of Calgary, Peter Choate, Mount Royal University and Patty, Lubecan- Benson from Native Friendship Centre.  We feel this is a great place for local experts to have impact on the system and inform the those that are also sitting on the panel about the complex nature of this work.

NEWS

Ministerial Panel On Child Intervention Meeting 1 Summary

Ministerial Child Review Panel Feb 9, 2017 Minute 2nd mtg

All
Child Intervention Review Panel Articles, News and Updates

Child Intervention Review Panel

ALIGN Executive Director Rhonda Barraclough December 2016. Request for agency representatives and experts to participate in review panel

Letter to Premier re Serenity Marie Case Review

NEW
Jan, 2017
Alberta Government News Release January 18, 2017 Government moves forward with panel to strengthen child intervention Members have been selected for a panel that will explore ways to improve Alberta’s child intervention system.The 13-member panel includes representatives from all parties in the legislature and leading Alberta experts on child intervention and Indigenous issues:

  • Chair: Debbie Jabbour, MLA for Peace River
  • Maria Fitzpatrick, MLA for Lethbridge-East
  • Nicole Goehring, MLA for Edmonton-Castle Downs
  • Graham Sucha, MLA for Calgary-Shaw
  • Heather Sweet, MLA for Edmonton-Manning
  • Cameron Westhead, MLA for Banff-Cochrane
  • Jason Nixon, Wildrose caucus, MLA for Rimbey-Rocky Mountain House-Sundre
  • Ric McIver, Interim Leader, Progressive Conservative caucus, MLA for Calgary-Hays
  • Dr. David Swann, Leader, Alberta Liberal caucus, MLA for Calgary-Mountain View
  • Greg Clark, Leader, Alberta Party caucus,  MLA for Calgary-Elbow
  • Dr. Peter Choate, MSW, PhD, Mount Royal University
  • Dr. Patti LaBoucane-Benson, PhD, Native Counselling Services of Alberta
  • Dr. Bruce MacLaurin, MSW, PhD, University of Calgary

Irfan Sabir, Minister of Human Services and MLA for Calgary-McCall, will sit as an ex-officio member on the panel.

See Additional Articles

Transitioning From Care Guide – Revised Edition

Now Available! Revised Edition (Please Note: This a large file and may take a minute or two to display)
Transitioning From Care Revised Version 2016
Jeff Solberg in collaboration with AASCF and AFPA. Developed to improves outcomes for youth in care and their caregiver

Collaborative Service Delivery (CSD) Table (Formerly The Foster Care Negotiation Table)

Update Sept 2017

Collaborative Service Delivery (CSD):
Recently through many different discussions it has become clear that there is some confusion amongst organizations regarding the understanding of the term Collaborative Services Delivery (CSD).  CSD is intended to be  an approach in delivering services to Alberta Children and Families under the umbrella of the Child Intervention Practice Framework (CIPF). This approach is being achieved but limited to initiatives such as; the Foundation of Caregiver Support, CSD lead sites, Family Finding  and Signs of Safety. Collaborative Service Delivery Leads Table are meeting to discuss future direction of the table.

Update October 2016

ALIGN currently represented on the Collaboration Table (Formerly The Foster Care Negotiation Table). Purpose: Ministry discusses foster care issues with agency, AFPA, DFNA, and others. Currently Jon Reeves is the chair and Mark Hattori is often there.

Alberta Mentoring Partnership Youth in Care (YIC) Mentoring Project

Update September 2017

Youth in Care Mentoring (YIC) and Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP)
A three-year commitment has been made to the agencies that are piloting Youth in Care Mentoring.  We are currently working on documenting a service delivery model.  There has been an updated literature review completed and the pilots are working with the advisory group to look at consist parts of the delivery and what it takes to offer this program area.

SNEAK PEAK: Resources for Mentoring Refugee, Immigrant & Newcomer Children and Youth

To access the resource one more step is required. Please fill in your contact information to assist in the role-out and evaluation of our new resource. AMP will not share your information, it is only for internal tracking purposes. In the next few months they will send you a brief survey asking for feedback.

 

Alberta Mentoring Partnership  Youth in Care (YIC) Mentoring Project Update August 2017

Notice to Members  from Michael Jan August 1, 2017

AMP partners work to expand and enhance quality youth mentoring programs for young adults across Alberta.  Here is an exclusive opportunity for a “Sneak Peak” of the new Indigenous Mentoring resources. You might use different language or program labels other than mentoring, but the principles and considerations outlined in the document are valuable for any program that supports Indigenous or non-Indigenous relationships. Share your feedback with Michael Janz michael.janz@albertamentors.ca about how this can be further mobilized into the community.

While ALIGN is a valued “Builder Partner” of the AMP (and Rhonda Barraclough is a member of the Leadership Team), each individual agency should be listed as a AMP Partner! If you have not done so already, please take a moment and fill out our “Partner contact form” so AMP can promote your work and your agency and you can take advantage of our volunteer recruitment capacity! Don’t worry, there is no charge because we are a no-fee partnership

Alberta Mentoring Partnership  Youth in Care (YIC) Mentoring Project Update October 2016
ALIGN sits at the Alberta Mentoring Partnership  leadership table and chairs the Youth in Care (YIC) Mentoring Project
The National Mentoring Conference: Mentoring is Catching On will be held in Nov 2016 and our project will be presenting there. We have also written an article that will be published in our next ALIGN Journal which will be of interest across Canada.

Indigenous Advisory Group

Update September 2017

The  ALIGN Indigenous Advisory Group  reconvened in the Fall of 2016 in order to gain some guidance in planning for the upcoming year. Some of the current recommendations that we are working on are:

  • It was suggested that we convene a circle of government decision makers and others to share what is being done in the research and community sectors.
  • To bring together a group who has a strong understanding of Trauma and Inter-generational Trauma to help guide the next step process.
  • A lot of Agencies have found ways that work for families and we should help highlight these approaches.

Update October 2016

ALIGN is presently reconvening and regrouping the Indigenous Advisory Group with a focus on becoming familiarized with the truth and reconciliation recommendations and the UN rights of children as well as meeting the new ADM for the Community Engagement area of the MHS currently working on engagement strategies to address the indigenous concerns of the child welfare system. Please stay tuned for further information in this important area of work.

Allying With Indigenous Peoples: The Practice Of Omanitew

Update Fall 2017

ALIGN held traning sessions in Edmonton and Calgary & South over 2017. An independent evaluation of the trainings has just been completed and provides an excellent overview of the ongoing benefits they both provide with regards to individual, and organization practice and awareness. The report will be released once reviewed by the working committee.

Check Related Training Events for Current Availability

Executive Summary Report Allying With Indigenous Peoples: The Practice Of Omanitew AASCF/ACCFCR 2013
In early 2012, the Alberta Association of Services for Children and Families (AASCF) created an Advisory Group to discuss the training needs of human service workers who work with
Indigenous children and families. Based on recommendations from the Advisory Group, it was decided to pilot a four-day experiential learning opportunity, a modified version of the five-day
University of Calgary Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) course entitled “Social Work with Indigenous Peoples”. Twenty-two individuals from a variety of agencies across the province
participated in the experiential learning opportunity from October 30 – November 2, 2012…

Evaluation Report Allying With Indigenous Peoples: The Practice Of Omanitew AASCF/ACCFCR 2013
In October 2012, the AASCF sponsored 22 human service workers on a pilot test basis, with a
commitment to follow-up with them to determine what difference the experience had made. What, if anything, were they doing differently in their work with children and families as a result
of their four-day experience? What impact did it have? And what was it about the experience that was making a difference? My role would be to help explore the answers to these questions. When I first asked the question, “what difference did the training make”, it was possible of course that it had made no difference whatsoever. I was open to listening to their stories. What words did they use to describe the experience? Their words ranged from reaffirming, empowering, intense, profound, and transformational. Participants were clear that the experience had made a difference. Change happened at different levels and in different ways, but change happened…

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA)

 

Update January 2017

Mental Wellness for Children and Youth in Care: Support for the Caregiver Conference Edmonton January 25, 2017

The main theme of the Mental Wellness for Children and Youth in Care: Support for the Caregiver symposium was the mental wellness of children and youth in care, the use of psychotropic medications and how caregivers can become more knowledgeable in supporting these youths. Caregiver encompassed agency and department foster parents, kinship parents, adoptive parents, residential and group care staff. The theme of the day presented by culturally informed medical experts, is the mental wellness of children/youth in care and the use of psychotropic medications considering issues such as the child’s emotional, medical and cultural needs. Youth themselves and representatives from the Office of the Children’s Advocate presented. The day ended with a panel discussion. Presenters: Dr. Wanda Polzin; Clinical Director at CASA in Edmonton, AB Dr. Lana Potts; Family Physician Siksika Family Clinic and Jeffery Cheng and Sheena Stevens; CYS Mental Health Nurses.

Videos

Welcome & Introductions Mental Wellness for Children and Youth in Care: Support for the Caregiver Edmonton January 25, 2017

Office of the Child and Youth Advocate Randy Baker, Lee Bowers & Adreana Brochu OCYA Representatives & Youth

Panel Discussion

The Importance of Caring for the Care Giver Dr. Wanda Polzin, MA, RSW, EdD Clinical Director – CASA

Understanding Psychotropic Medications for Children in Care Jeffrey Cheng /Sheena Stevens Nurse Consultants – CASA

Who We Are First Nations People in Alberta Dr. Lana Potts Family Physician

Celebrating and Supporting Diversity Presented by David Rust

Drugs 101 Jennie McLester

View All Conference Video’s

History

Because of the good work done by the Psychotropic Medication Committee who developed the “Pathways to Better Mental Health” resource, the same individuals were asked to participate on the MHFA symposium/ training committee. The committee members representing foster parents ALIGN, Ministry of Human Services, agencies, CASA, and the AFPA met on June 20, and August 11 and Sept 15 to discuss the symposium development and other training that will be helpful to support caregivers in the mental health area. “Caregiver” encompasses agency and department foster parents, kinship parents, adoptive parents, residential and group care staff.
The main theme of the symposium will be the mental wellness of youth in care, the use of psychotropic medications and how caregivers can become more knowledgeable in supporting these youths. We plan to have medical expertise as well as culturally informed individuals presenting. Representatives from the OCYA have agreed to present and this will include hearing from youths who are or who have experienced treatment with psychotropic medications. The presentation will include what worked, what didn’t work and what could caregivers do differently to support the youth better.

Workforce Alliance: Cross Association Workforce Survey

The Alberta Government: Workforce Alliance was launched in April 2012 to address support for a stable and sustainable workforce that meets the needs of children, families and adults with disabilities. It consists of government representatives and service providers, who work together to create a long-term plan for the workforce.

Alberta Human Services Workforce Alliance Strategic Plan – (2013 and revised 2016)
Building the Social Services Workforce of the Future April 2013 Submitted by: Human Services Workforce Alliance

ALIGN Workforce Alliance Update October 2016
ALIGN was previously requested by the Workforce Alliance to complete a cross association workforce survey but it is unclear at this time if this will proceed as it seems to be less of a government priority following reorganization of the Ministry

The Extent of the “Main Associations Contracted” Sector Prepared by Boles Consulting May 2015
A significant component of the nongovernment social service sector, including non-profit and for-profit agencies, enters into contract and grant funded agreements with the Ministry of Human Services to deliver services to vulnerable individuals and families. Most of the agencies hold membership(s) in one or more of 4 associations which commit to supporting their efforts and promoting the delivery of quality services. The group of agencies is identified here as the “Main Associations Contracted” sector and referred to as the “MA Sector” or “Sector”. The 4 associations, their members, and the Ministry of Human Services have a collective interest in describing the Sector…

AASCF (ALIGN) Review of Provincial Budget 2015
The Workforce Alliance continues to work as a joint government and community committee that gives advice to the Ministry on issues of workforce. WE sit at that table and continue to advocate strongly for a healthy viable human services contracted workforce

AASCF (ALIGN) 2014 Membership Survey Results & Analysis Boles Consulting
Includes data on impact on wage increases, workforce turnover, retention and recruitment and related workforce information.

AASCF (ALIGN) Annual Report 2013/2014
Workforce Challenges/ Issues and Efforts to Date
The Workforce Alliance remains a viable committee. At this time it is considering what a healthy workforce is and what it can do to work towards developing that. Currently a literature review of this area is underway and some data is being gathered to draw a picture of the sector including the agencies that sit within AASCF, ACDS, AWSA, AHVNA. This is collaborative work that is being conducted with government input as well.

Over the past year the focus has been on wage increases, contracting and looking at ways to make contracts more consistent and flexible, and training in various parts of the sector.
Wage increases:

Generally speaking in 2012/2013 there were $1500.00 bonuses for front line delivery staff and a 5% increase in wages. There was some variation on this in certain sectors. At the time it included Women’s Shelters, Child and Family services contracted agencies and agencies contracting to provide PDD services, and brain injury providers

AASCF (ALIGN) Membership Minutes 2013
Workforce Alliance – This is a provincial committee because the Premier and ministers decided this sector is important and they need to deal with our issues and concerns.  Even though there was a bad news budget they kept their commitment.  The work that needed to be done couldn’t be done without this sector.  We have come a long way in the last 5 years.The agencies will be given the task on how the wage increase money will be allocated.  There is another wage increase year but accountability and responsibility comes with the money.  As they continue to invest money in this sector they need information from us on what a difference the increases are making.  We will be sending out a survey to gather this information.  Operational costs have been discussed is a separate issue.

Alberta Workforce Updates & News
AB Human Services Contracting
ALIGN Reports
Provincial Budgets

Opioid Strategies/Resources

ALIGN has continued to sit on a working group with the Children’s Services Opioid strategy as it pertains to all caregivers (agency and provincial). Information sheets and a training manual have been developed and is currently being reviewed by ministry staff. Once approved, this information will be provided to all agencies and caregivers.This Tip Sheet that has been developed by a committee representing provincial Children Services , AFPA and ALIGN.

ALIGN RESOURCES
ALIGN Resource Directory – Opioids and Workplace – OHS Resource Directory.

The Role of Caregivers in Assessing and Managing Risk Related to Opioid Use – A Tip Sheet October 24, 2017
As a caregiver you are the closest person to the day-to-day activities of a child or youth who may be using opioids. You have a key role on the team who together ensure the tasks in the above diagram occur, plans are implemented and reviewed as circumstances change.  Questions can be directed to Cathym@alignab.ca

SECTOR NEWS/RESOURCES

CCSA Launches ‘Best Practices across the Continuum of Care for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder’ August 2018
This report, developed to inform Health Canada’s Federal, Provincial and Territorial Treatment Task Group, outlines the standard of service that should implemented to provide person-centred care to all people experiencing harms from opioids. The report includes a summary of actions taking place across Canada at multiple levels of government to help.

New Opioid Crisis Supports for Indigenous People
A provincial grant to Native Friendship Centres is supporting the hiring of four navigators to connect people with life-saving treatment, harm reduction and culturally sensitive wraparound services. Navigators have been hired in Edmonton, Calgary, Lethbridge and Grande Prairie with the support of the $400,000 grant. Workshops, naloxone training sessions and educational material will also be provided to staff at Friendship Centres in 21 communities throughout the province. These new tools will support greater substance-use awareness and prevention and strengthen access to culturally appropriate services for Indigenous people…

Alberta Health Resource How to Spot an Opioid Overdose
If you’re using drugs, or are with someone who is using, these are the signs and symptoms to watch out for. If they happen, don’t leave things to chance, call 911 immediately. Canada’s new Good Samaritan law can protect you. For step by step instructions on what to do in the event you suspect someone is overdosing, watch Ask a Paramedic if you have a naloxone kit follow the SAVE ME steps and instructions below

New Website – Fentanyl Safety for First Responders

ACSW Your Professional Duties Around Take Home Naloxone Kits

Alberta.ca Protection of workers from synthetic opioid exposure : OHS information for employers

Alberta Health New Report: “Opioids and Substances of Misuse: Alberta Q2 Interim Report 2017

Alberta Government Release May 31, 2017 The province has established a dedicated emergency commission to help ramp up Alberta’s ability to respond to the opioid crisis.
The province has established a dedicated emergency commission to help ramp up Alberta’s ability to respond to the opioid crisis. The Minister’s Opioid Emergency Response Commission was created with a new regulation under the Public Health Act. The commission’s mandate is to implement urgent coordinated actions to address this public health crisis…

College of Physicians tells members to report youth who use fentanyl to Children’s Services Edmonton Journal May 13, 2017
The bulletin refers to an unidentified Alberta doctor who was reportedly treating a minor, under the age of 18, for addiction. According the college, the doctor had known for three years that the young patient was using fentanyl. But the doctor never contacted Children’s Services.

“In this case, the physician had an obligation to notify proper authorities because of the significant risk of an accidental fentanyl overdose by the minor,” Dr. Michael Caffaro, the college’s assistant registrar and complaints director, told his members.

“I hope this reminds all physicians of their duty to report in such circumstances.”

CDC Fentanyl: Preventing Occupational Exposure to Emergency Responders
The risks associated with fentanyl and its analogs highlight the need for first responders to perform a risk assessment on each crime scene and follow established work practices appropriate for the specific job tasking along with wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) to effectively manage risks that may cause an exposure. Established work practices are written policies and procedures, as well as tactics and techniques, used when fentanyl may be present to minimize the risk of exposure. This DEA website highlights the importance of adhering to established policies and procedures: DEA Issues Carfentanil Warning to Police and Public Dangerous opioid 10,000 times more potent than morphine and 100 times more potent than fentanyl

New Website – Fentanyl Safety for First Responders
The status and trends of the illicit drug trade, which includes Fentanyl, Fentanyl analogues and other potent synthetic opioids and analgesics in Canada are ever evolving. The intention of this site is to provide first responders with accurate safety information related to situations where opioids may be involved.

Alberta government under fire for response to record 343 fentanyl deaths Naloxone kits will be available to all police, firefighters and paramedics, and to members of the public Min Dhariwal · CBC News Feb 8, 2017

Province Expands Naloxone Program, Adds Treatment Spaces February 7, 2017
Alberta firefighters have greater access to lifesaving naloxone kits now that all first responders can administer naloxone by injection.

Opioids and Substance of Misuse Fourth Quarter Report (pdf)

Responding to Alberta’s Opioid Crisis Public Progress Report (pdf)

Opioid Poisoning Puts More Canadians In Hospital Each Year. Here’s What Ottawa Plans To Do Karen Howlett And Kelly Grant The Globe And Mail Last Updated: Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016

Alberta Implementing New Tools to Address Overdoses/Deaths Related to Fentanyl and Opioids Fall 2016

29th Legislature, 2nd Session (2016) Bill 205: Pharmacy and Drug (Pharmaceutical Equipment Control) Amendment Act, 2016

Video – Mike Ellis Members’ Statements Legislative Assembly of Alberta 2nd Session of the 29th Legislature May 9th, 2016

Video – MLA Drever Speaks in Support of Bill 205 – Pharmacy and Drug Amendment Act

Mental Health Advisory committee. Team members continue to focus on Alberta’s fentanyl response, while also taking on the broader mandate of supporting the implementation of Valuing Mental Health: Report of the Alberta Mental Health Review Committee

AMH – Video – Listen and Learn, May 2015 – Fentanyl Awareness This episode of the Listen and Learn series discusses fentanyl, its impact in Alberta, emergency interventions, and prevention/harm reduction strategies.

CAMH Course: CAMH Opioid Dependence Treatment Core Course (Alberta Version)
This course is the foundation of the Opioid Dependence Treatment Certificate Program. The course is designed to promote interprofessional collaboration among the health care team involved in opioid dependence treatment. In this online course physicians, nurses, pharmacists and counsellors/case managers learn skills and review guidelines for effective and safe management of clients receiving methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment for opioid dependence.

Child Intervention Practice Framework

Update September 2017

Child Intervention Practice committee is presently reviewing how to create consistencies and best practice provincially. This committee consists of Regional managers. ALIGN and the AFPA.
See index for related topics

 Update October  2016
Agencies were asked to submit a PQR in 2016 and were required to answer if they would be providing “Trauma Informed” programming. Through the work of the document of Foundation of Caregiver Support it is the expectation of CFS that anyone providing services will be Trauma – Informed in their practice. This term used in conjunction of the understanding of the three pillars of the Foundation of Caregiver Support are expected to provide clarity to the sectors providing front line services.

Nicole McFadyen (ALIGN) has spent the last few months attending several different “Trauma Informed” training sessions. Some have been Provincial intiatives like the Neurosquential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) funded by the Alberta Children and Family Sevices and provided by Hull Child and Family Services. Others, have been Trauma Informed Training from Early Childhood Development Support Services (ECDSS) , as well as Alberta Health Services Trauma training webinar. All courses do provide information regarding the Core Story, Brain Development and Trauma. They do provide information on working with individuals who have experienced trauma and the neruodevelopmetnal approach to understanding these individuals. Some also look at how being a caregiver in the field provides exposure to vicarious trauma and Trauma Informed practice from an organizational level. Presently the Palix Foundation is working on their own Trauma training series. The Sheldon Kennedy Advocacy Care Centre is also developing an online Trauma Awareness Training. In collaborative conversation with Agencies, CFS, Palix Foundation and the Sheldon Kennedy Advocacy Care Centre and the Foundation of Caregiver Support Steering Committee (FOCS), there has been some agreement that the general term may be providing misunderstandings with regards to the overall definition and/or terms of references for the term “Trauma Informed ” practice. Presently we are meeting to work out a definition that will give everyone a better understanding of where individual sector practices sit on the spectrum.

The FOCS is doing a literature review to look at different Evidence – based models of therapy that are Trauma-Informed. The committee has also requested advisory from the Provincial Collaboration table for future recommendations and direction. Children and Families Services division has completed the development of 101 training to look at 4 main areas from this document. The Core Story of Brain Development, Grief and Loss and Trauma, Stress and the Developing Brain. This 101 training series is presently being piloted the AFPA Fall 2016 conference and the ALIGN 2017 January conference. They will be requesting feedback from participants in order to make changes to the curriculum as the pilot rolls out over the next several months. The developers are also in the beginning phases of providing a fifth module to look at Multigenerational trauma through an Indigenous lens. The 101 training series working group has invited ALIGN to join the group to provide review and input into the training curriculum and delivery. This group is meeting later this fall to work on implementations of participant feedback.

Alberta Human Services Enhancement Policy Manual (Manual) 2016 contains policies and procedures that direct casework staff when delivering services under the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act (CYFEA). The policies have been written in a second person active voice and directly address casework staff unless another role is specifically identified. The Manual is comprised of three distinct parts: Enhancement Policy Manual – Intervention, Enhancement Policy Manual – Placement Resources, and Enhancement Policy Manual – Adoption…

2015

Alberta Human Services Child Intervention Practice Framework (CIPF) Focus on Aboriginal community conversations, the policy and legislative review of the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act and the Child Intervention Practice Framework (CIPF)

2014

Ministerial Roundtable: Investigations and Reporting of Deaths and Serious Injuries Summary Report (April 2014)

Roundtable reading and resources

CIPF Engagement Summary Results of Stakeholder Engagement on the Child Intervention Practice Framework Principles Child and Family Services Division Results of Stakeholder, October 2013 – February 2014

Revised Enhancement Policy Manual (Manual) November 2014
Contains policies and procedures that direct casework staff when delivering services under the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act (CYFEA). The policies have been written in a second person active voice and directly address casework staff unless another role is specifically identified.

Child Intervention Forum May 2014
Video’s From Child Intervention Research Forum – May 1, 2014

CIPF Stakeholder Engagement
CIPF Engagement Summary – Results of Stakeholder Engagement on the Child Intervention Practice Framework Principles, October 2013 – February 2014

Child Intervention Round Table

Health, Wellness and Safety in the Child and Family Services Sector

Update September 2017

Health and Safety in the Child and Family Services Sector:
ALIGN continues to be a partner on the research team of the Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions Project. Join us for the Healthy Workplace Conference Edmonton October 13, 2017  Graham Lowe author of “Creating Healthy Organizations” will be the key note speaker. A second voluntary survey is currently being completed by human services staff to allow for a comparison with the findings of the first survey results of 2 years ago.  The results of this research, surveys and training will be presented at the fall conference.

We met with a representative for the Ministry of Labor in the Partnership Unit in the spring who recommended ALIGN explore the possibility of a collaborative relationship with the Alberta Association for Safety Partnerships(AASP) as a Certifying Partner. Conversations with the ED of the AASP have occurred and the plan is to apply jointly for grant funding from the Ministry of Labor to provide interested agencies with a series of training sessions (referred to as “The Roadmap to COR”) to obtain a Certificate of Recognition. Concurrently we will meet with agencies who have successfully obtained their COR and see what we can learn from them to pass on to other agencies.

We have also begun researching information on the National Standard of Canada on Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace.  We think there is other work that can be done and agencies can benefit from that is not to the extreme of COR yet may help with WCB rates.  That will be developed over the next 6 months.

 

Update May 2017

Healthy Workplaces Research Team Meeting Tue May 30, 2017 9am – 12pm
Contact: ttbarker@ualberta.ca

AGENDA
Preview preliminary survey results
Review Conference plans
Review end-of-project plans It appears that our original goal to “influence” provincial wellness policy needs to be altered: we want to “be” provincial wellness policy. This means that we need to undertake a campaign to encourage the Ministry of Labour to take up our Healthy Workplaces Framework as its recommended framework. To do this we need your help to develop a clear strategy with action items for the rest of the year. Your contribution is vital, as it has been throughout the entire project.

Survey Open Now! – 2nd Round
Workplace Health Survey of the Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions (HWHP) project.

Healthy Workplaces Intervention Framework: We are beginning to see a framework that we can make available to non-profit human-services sector agencies in 2017.

Now Open for Registration – The Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions

Healthy Workplaces Conference 2017

Mark your calendars! The Healthy Workplaces Conference 2017 will occur on October 13, 2017 at the Lister Centre, University of Alberta. This province-wide conference will showcase the final results and provide tools for developing and implementing sustainable workplace wellness programs for non-profit human service agencies. Participation is open to all human services agencies in Alberta

As leaders and employees in the nonprofit human-services sector of Alberta, you are invited to participate in a province-wide educational and resource/networking conference marking the completion of the Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions project that ALIGN has been participating on (See below).  Join us for an exciting day of project results, policy framework descriptions, workshop opportunities, and professional networking.

Topics:  Employee engagement and wellness

Keynote:  Dr. Graham Lowe, “Redesigning Work to Support a Vibrant Workforce — Lessons for Human Services.”

Date:  Friday, October 13, 2017

Cost:  $95 (Early bird before June 30), $125 Regular fee (All prices include the registration fee, coffee breaks and lunch.)

Conference Brochure

Conference Registration Web Page

Related

Five Ways to Reduce Stress at Human-Services Work. Ideas from participants of our Be a Wellness Leader Workshops to make the office a place you want to go every day.

Wellness Program Ideas for Your Workplace. Our infographic lists wellness program ideas suggested by participants of our Be a Wellness Leader Workshops. Any wellness initiatives must be developed based on and evaluated against the Five Wellness Pillars, following the Wellness Cycle.

The Healthy Workplaces Framework Infographic. 

The Healthy Helping Cycle  Healthy Helping Cycle This article explains the relationship between the process of client assistance and health and the growth of a vibrant, healthy organization.

Be a Wellness Leader Workshop Slides.  Take good notes

Health Risk Daily Assessment This tool provides a way for front-line staff to assess risks on a daily basis.

The Helping Cycle this tool provides a way for front-line staff and supervisors to assess risks in specific situations and to find ways to grow challenges into strengths rather than hazards into stress.

Welcome to the Be a Wellness Leader Workshop.
The following items have been developed by the Healthy Workplaces Project Team members and tested at conferences and in the Winter 2016 BWL Workshop Series. They are presented here for the use by non‐profit human‐service agencies in Alberta. There is no charge for their use and they are presented “as is.” The workshop is intended to be a half‐day or 2‐3 hour format and presenters can adjust the time to the situation. There is no cost for the materials.

Workplace Health and Wellness-The Next Step in Workplace Productivity
Presented at ALIGN Chapter Meeting, Norwood Centre, November 5, 2016

Learning From Employees The Healthy Workplaces Research Summary Report By Thomas Barker, Project Lead Hoa Tran, Research Coordinator July, 2016 (ALIGN Partnership)

See OHS Library

 

Signs of Safety/Family Finding Updates

ALIGN Signs of Safety

Fall 2016 Nicole McFadyen (ALIGN) has been invited to sit on the Signs of Safety working group. Updates to come in this area.

Signs of Safety Is an innovative strengths-based, safety-organized approach to child protection casework. The model of its approach was created in Western Australia by Andrew Turnell and Steve Edwards, who worked with over 150 front-line statutory practitioners and based it on what those practitioners know works well with difficult cases. The Signs of Safety approach has attracted international attention and is being used in jurisdictions in North America, Europe and Australasia

See News and Resources for Signs of Safety

The Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions Updates

Healthy Workplaces Conference 2017

Mark your calendars! The Healthy Workplaces Conference 2017 will occur on October 13, 2017 at the Lister Centre, University of Alberta. This province-wide conference will showcase the final results and provide tools for developing and implementing sustainable workplace wellness programs for non-profit human service agencies. Participation is open to all human services agencies in Alberta

As leaders and employees in the nonprofit human-services sector of Alberta, you are invited to participate in a province-wide educational and resource/networking conference marking the completion of the Healthy Workplaces for Helping Professions project that ALIGN has been participating on (See below).  Join us for an exciting day of project results, policy framework descriptions, workshop opportunities, and professional networking.

Topics:  Employee engagement and wellness

Keynote:  Dr. Graham Lowe, “Redesigning Work to Support a Vibrant Workforce — Lessons for Human Services.”

Date:  Friday, October 13, 2017

Cost:  $95 (Early bird before June 30), $125 Regular fee (All prices include the registration fee, coffee breaks and lunch.)

Conference Brochure

Conference Registration Web Page

Related

Welcome to the Be a Wellness Leader Workshop.
The following items have been developed by the Healthy Workplaces Project Team members and tested at conferences and in the Winter 2016 BWL Workshop Series. They are presented here for the use by non‐profit human‐service agencies in Alberta. There is no charge for their use and they are presented “as is.” The workshop is intended to be a half‐day or 2‐3 hour format and presenters can adjust the time to the situation. There is no cost for the materials.

Workplace Health and Wellness-The Next Step in Workplace Productivity
Presented at ALIGN Chapter Meeting, Norwood Centre, November 5, 2016

Learning From Employees The Healthy Workplaces Research Summary Report By Thomas Barker, Project Lead Hoa Tran, Research Coordinator July, 2016 (ALIGN Partnership)

Pathways to Mental Health Making Every Step Count for Children in Care – AASCF and AFPA 2016

Pathways to Mental Health Making Every Step Count for Children in Care – AASCF and AFPA 2016
Pathways to Mental Health Making Every Step Count for Children in Care When someone we care for experiences mental health concerns we naturally want to ensure that he or she receives the best care available, as soon as possible. However, most parents have little experience navigating the ins-and-outs of the mental health system. Unfortunately, the steep learning curve can end up costing valuable time, delaying treatment and adding to the grief, pain, and suffering for both the child and the family around him. Using this guide can help you avoid delays

Child Welfare League of Canada Board Member Updates

Update September 2017

ALIGN continues to sit on the CWLC Board.  The most recent activity is the National Forum on infant, child mental health in Calgary the first week of October.

Update October 2016

Meeting PEI June 2016
We met with Cindy Blackstock for the First Nation Caring Society about how the CWLC can support the activities of the FNCS and their work with the truth and reconciliation recommendations and moving the agenda forward for indigenous children. CWLC wrote a letter of support and is trying to be strategic in its activities going forward.

Child and Youth Services (CYS) Contract Updates

Update – August 2016

First-quarter, sole-source government service contracts disclosed The Government of Alberta’s online database has been updated with service contracts awarded outside a formal competition process during the last fiscal quarter.

Procurement Advisory Table The Agency and Human Services Procurement Advisory Table (PAT) is intended to provide a platform for informal, focused dialogue between Human Services and a small group of leaders from the service provider sector about the ministry’s contracting and procurement practices. The PAT provides an opportunity to leverage the experience, ideas and influence of these sector leaders on the design and implementation of future-state contracting strategies or approaches. The development of these strategies will align with Human Services’ goal of integrated service delivery, and support service delivery partnerships that are efficient, effective and achieve the outcomes Albertans need and expect.

Terms of Reference

Membership List

Update CYS and the Service Delivery Regions – Where Things Are At June 2016
Edmonton and Calgary either have or will be raising the following issues with ALIGN

Child and Youth Services (CYS) Contract Templates: Summary of April 21, 2016 Discussion (ALIGN and Human Services) and Recommendations

Innovations in Outcome Based Service Deliver in Calgary, Alberta February 2015 by Susan Gardiner, Bruce MacLaurin and Jon Reeves

 

Foundations of Caregiver Support (FCS)

Update May 2018

Foundations of Caregiver Support 101 Trauma Training Series Train the Trainer Spring/Summer 2018

This is an exciting opportunity to be part of a cultural shift, that will positively affect outcomes for children and families.

FCS aligns with the Child Intervention Practice Framework, Signs of Safety, and the Prevention and Early Intervention Framework to support positive interactions between workers, children and youth, and their caregivers.

In the first phase of delivery, four of the FCS modules were piloted with select front-line staff and caregivers over the course of 2016-17, including the 2016 and 2017 AFPA conferences, and the Northwest Aboriginal Caregiver Training Retreat (Treaty 8) in 2016 and 2017.

In phase two, CS and First Nation Agencies (DFNA) front-line workers, and caregivers will receive the training.

  • Phase two training is expected to be completed for current workers by June, 2018.
  • This training will be mandatory for delegated staff. However, all CS staff will be encouraged to take the training.
  • CS aims to train all existing caregivers by the Fall of 2019.

Key stakeholders, including the Alberta Foster/Kinship Association (AFKA) and ALIGN Association of Community Services, have been involved in this project and will play a key role in the delivery of the FCS modules to caregivers. ALIGN will be hosting train the trainer opportunities in your area in 2018 to give agencies the material to train their own staff and caregivers, as well,  ALIGN will be hosting the training series in 2018/2019 for agencies staff and cargivers throughout the province.

Phase three will be the incorporation of this material into Work Force Development (June 2018) and on-going Caregiver training (Fall 2018).

Updated February 2018

The Three Core Trauma-Related Needs Dr. Howard Bath Alberta, January/February

Update September 2017

The Committee is in the process of  reviewing the recently released  Review of  literature with the focus on Aboriginal Peoples and Communities – Trauma,Child Development, Healing and Resilience. The expectation is that organizations in Alberta serving child, youth and families must be Trauma Informed along with understanding Child Brain Development and stress. This is the foundational work for the 101 training that will come out this up coming year.

The definition of Trauma Informed Care  has 4 common elements; Trauma Awareness, Emphasis on Safety, Rebuild Control for person served and  the approach is Strength Based. There is many ways for Organizations and their programs to make sure they are meeting these common elements in all the work they do.

Update June 2015

Foundations of Caregiver Support – June 2015
This document provides the vision and purpose of the Foundations of Caregiver Support and a description of it’s three foundational pillars: child development, trauma, and loss and grief. The document is part of a communication and engagement strategy for Child Intervention staff and stakeholders. Primary stakeholders include: Human Services staff and divisions, Delegated First Nation Agencies (DFNA), Alberta Foster Parent Association, ALIGN, and other agencies, partners and the community…

Pharmaceutical Nurse Supports Available

Child Adolescent and Family Mental Health
Pharmaceutical Nurse Supports Available
Jeffrey Cheng has begun in his role as Pharmaceutical Nurse Consultant. Jeff’s role is in partnership between AACSF, CFS, and CASA. He can begin to receive referrals immediately from CFS Managers, Foster Parent Agency Managers and Group Care Managers. Jeff will primarily be located at the HSBC Building in Edmonton. He is available during regular business hours Monday through Friday and can be reached by phone at (780) 644-3303, by cell at (780) 221-2523, or via e-mail at jcheng@casaservices.org. Should you wish to communicate with Jeff about any nursing matters, please just be aware not to send any private identifying information through e-mail. Matters that might be of interest to consult with Jeff about:
• Any questions relating to medication, and specifically with regard to psychotropic
medications
• Queries and clarification needs about medication as it relates to a diagnosis
• Desired information on Mental Health and/or Addictions treatment and/or
diagnosis
• Questions relating to various diagnosis such as ADHD, Anxiety, Oppositional
Defiant Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, PTSD, Tourette’s Disorder,
Depression, Mood related diagnosis, FASD, etc.
• Desired hard copy and/or electronic Mental Health and Addiction resources for
children, youth, and families

After-Hours Crisis Support Services for Caregivers Feb 2015

Child Adolescent and Family Mental Health
After-Hours Crisis Support Services for Caregivers Feb 2015
Achok Elnour has joined the After-Hours Crisis Support Services for Caregivers team. Along with other multi-disciplinary team members, Achok will be available to support caregivers beyond regular business hours Mondays through Fridays, weekends and Holidays (24 hours). This support is available to all caregivers across the province with exception of Calgary and the surrounding area. After-Hours Crisis Support Services for Caregivers has been developed in partnership between CFS and CASA to
provide mental health and/or addiction support for children, youth, and their families (kinship, foster, adoptive, permanent placement, and biological). Therapists will be available by phone and are not intended to go out to attend to emergencies (as these calls are directed to the Mobile Response Team, MRT). Calls for this service may come through CFS Crisis Services, although caregivers may also call directly at (587) 982-CASA or alternatively (587) 982-2272. Additionally, any non-urgent questions, requests for mental health resources or supports for infants, children, adults and/or families can be sent to crisissupport@casaservices.org.
Please just be advised that e-mail questions/queries should not contain personal/identifying information. CASA After-Hours Crisis Support staff may be helpful in situations such as:
Navigation of Mental Health and/or Addictions systems and services across Alberta
relieving the immediate concerns of the caregivers through brief, solution-focused mental health
interventions via telephone, improving the ability caregiver(s) to manage the child and their relationship, through discussing various bio-psycho-social strategies, providing individual or group information to caregivers (via workshops, electronic information, etc.)
on mental health and/or addictions issues. Increasing the capacity of the Crisis Service Team to respond to mental health concerns. Crisis Assessors and therapists will be able to consult one another in realtime, thereby improving their ability to support caregivers in crisis situations.

Reconstructing Group Care 2013

Reconstructing Group and Residential Care – The Discussion
Residential treatment has been used as the consequence of ‘cascading failure’, rather than a service or intervention at the right time in order to achieve successful outcomes. Need to rethink how we conceptualize group and residential care from a ‘placement’ to a ‘service’…

Reconstructing GroupResidential Care in Alberta A discussion paper version 2  by Rhonda Barraclough 2013
As part of an effort to examine and evaluate the group/ residential care outcomes for youth in Alberta service providers from around the province have participated in a discussion session at the request of the Alberta Association of Services for Children and Families (AASCF). This paper is a recording of those discussions and is intended to be a starter for further discussion with the Ministry of Human Services.

Outcomes Based Service Delivery Readiness Assessment Tool 2012

This Readiness Assessment Tool 2012 was developed, based on information from: “lessons learned”, in-depth consultations with Regions and Agencies, literature review and OBSD documents. Representatives from contracted agencies, Child and Family Service Authorities (CFSAs) and the Department have contributed significantly to its development. The Tool is intended to facilitate transition to OBSD and can be used by a range of stakeholders. It is designed to bring evidence-informed approaches into planning and implementation.